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Good Things Grow in Ontario!

Sue smiling and holding two strawberries as earrings in strawberry field

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I was a kid, I remember singing the tune ‘Good things grow in Ontario!’ And that lyric still holds true today.

I was recently invited by Farm Food Care Ontario to attend a farm tour in beautiful Norfolk County where we had the chance to learn more about food and agriculture!

First stop: Strawberry Tyme Farms

Dalton and John Cooper standing in a high tunnel strawberry field

Meet Dalton Cooper, a 4th generation berry farmer and his dad John. Originally an apple farm since 1939, the family now grows berries using innovative varieties and growing techniques. Traditionally, strawberries harvest in June but a new ‘day-neutral’ strawberry fruits for 5-6 months, extending the typical strawberry season from June / July well into October.

John gave us a little strawberry physiology lesson to understand how this works. ‘June strawberries’ are named as such because they fruit in June. These berries are planted in the Fall when the days are short, and bear fruit in June when the days are long. On the other hand, ‘day-neutral’ strawberries are an annual variety planted in the spring with berries ready to pick about 12 weeks later. The berries continue fruiting regardless of the length of the day, which is why they’re called ‘day-neutral’!

The strawberries are grown on table tops in high tunnels which protect the berries from damaging heavy rains and maintains a moderate temperature. Not to mention, it’s much easier to pick these berries! The Cooper family also grows long cane raspberries, a growing technique where the berries are grown in pots and produce fruit in their second year.

Fun facts: There are 675 farms across Ontario which grow strawberries. Ontario growers produce between 6,000-7,000 tonnes of strawberries each year!

 

Next stop: Suncrest Orchards

Farmers Amanda and Hayden with their family of Jamaican workers

Image: Facebook Suncrest Orchards

Farmers Amanda and Hayden Dooney have owned the Suncrest Orchards since 2019 and work with a wonderful Jamaican family of eight employees including Raymond and George.  They’re seasonal agricultural workers who come up to the farm as early as March and stay until the end of October or longer. The farm grows and harvests seven different varieties of apples: Paula Red, Ginger Gold, Sunrise, Golden Delicious, Honey Crisp, Royal Gala and Ambrosia.

Red gala apples growing on a bush

At lunch, we had the wonderful opportunity to chat with some of the workers. Amanda says, “We have huge respect and appreciation for the sacrifice they make to come up and help with our orchard.”  Livian, (pictured front left below), for example, has worked seasonally on farms for 25 years and is proud to have supported his four kids through university. Indeed, let’s all give our thanks to the amazing farmers and seasonal agricultural workers who work so hard to grow delicious and nutritious food!

Are you hosting an educational tour? Contact me to cover the event and share highlights!

This event was sponsored travel and this blog reflects my own learning experiences. Thanks to the event sponsors for hosting a truly inspiring and heart-warming event: Farm and Food Care OntarioGreenBeltMore than a Migrant WorkerOntario Apple GrowersOntario Berries and the Ontario Produce Marketing Association.

 

Apple Pie Overnight Oats

 

4 jars of apple pie overnight oats with apples and flowers in the background

Apple Pie Overnight Oats

This delicious breakfast features nutritious oats and the cozy flavours of apple pie. It's all made ahead of time so you can go ahead and hit that snooze button!
Course Breakfast
Servings 1

Ingredients
  

  • 1/2 apple, diced
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 3/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/3 cup oats
  • 1/3 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon

Instructions
 

  • In a microwave-safe bowl, toss apples with maple syrup and cinnamon. Cook in the microwave for 45-60 seconds.
  • In a container or jar, add oats, milk, yogurt, maple syrup and cinnamon. Stir well to combine.
  • Spoon cooked apple on top of the oat mixture.
  • Cover and refrigerate overnight. Stir before eating.
Keyword apple pie overnight oats, apples, breakfast, breakfast ideas, breakfast recipes, easy breakfast recipe, oats, overnight oats

How much caffeine is too much?

A person holding a the handle of a coffee mug. An image of Sue's face in the overlay.

Health Canada has set recommended maximum daily amounts of caffeine depending on your age. For children and teens under the age of 18, the recommended caffeine intake depends on their body weight. Consuming too much caffeine can lead to insomnia, irritability, nervousness and headaches. If you’re sensitive to caffeine, consider having less.

chart with caffeine recommendations for age groups

Caffeine is found naturally in coffee, tea, chocolate and certain flavourings such as guarana and yerba mate. Check out the caffeine content of some common foods and beverages to see where you’re at with your caffeine intake for the day. Keep in mind that many mugs and store bought drinks are larger than a standard cup.

chart with caffeine intake of foods and beverages

Do you have a food or nutrition question?  Ask me and I’ll feature the answer in one of my next newsletters.

Fluffy Orange Pancakes

 

Fluffy Orange Pancakes

My family's favourite recipe! Perfect for brunch, Mother's Day or a weekend at the cottage! If you have any leftovers, freeze them between sheets of parchment paper.
Course Breakfast, Brunch, Mother's Day
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 3/4 cups orange juice
  • 2 Tbsp butter, melted
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp orange zest
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour or whole wheat flour (or a mix of both)
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • butter or oil for cooking

Instructions
 

  • In a large bowl, whisk egg and milk. Add orange juice, melted butter, vanilla extract and orange zest. Whisk to combine.
  • In another bowl, stir together flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add to the orange juice mixture and stir just enough to moisten.
  • In a large skillet, melt butter or heat oil over medium-high heat, to coat the pan.
  • Pour in 1/4 to 1/3 cup of batter (for small pancakes) or 1/2 cup batter for large pancakes. Cook for about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes or until small bubbles begin to appear and the pancake begins to set. The bottoms should be golden. Flip the pancake and cook for another 30 seconds to 1 minute or until set.
  • Enjoy with your favourite toppings! Makes 12-16 small pancakes or 8 large pancakes.

What are pink strawberries?

A cluster of pink strawberries with an overlay of Sue's headshot and the words "What are pink strawberries?"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have you seen these little pink strawberries at Costco or your local grocery store?

They look like underripe strawberries, but they’re not. These little gems are actually pineberries – which is a fusion of the words “pineapple” and “strawberry” although there isn’t any pineapple in them. In fact, the pineberry belongs to the strawberry family and is a cross between the strawberries native to North America (Fragaria virginiana) and strawberries native to Chile (Fragaria chiloensis). Inside, the flesh is white. You may also see these cute little berries called pineberry strawberries or hula pineberries.

What do pineberries taste like?

Pineberries have a softer and creamier texture than a red strawberry. There are subtle aromas and flavours of pineapple (thus the name pineberry), pear and apricot.

What about nutrition?

Both pineberries and strawberries contain vitamin C, folate, fibre and potassium. Strawberries will have higher levels of “anthocyanins” – which are the healthy plant compounds that give strawberries their beautiful red colour. Since they’re more rare than red strawberries, pineberries tend to be more expensive.

How to eat pineberries?

Ripe pineberries will have a blush pink colour and bright red seeds. Eat pineberries the same way you would strawberries! Add them to your yogurt bowl, toss into a salad or add a handful to a snack board.

Will you try them? Have you tried them? Tell me what you think in the comments!

 

My interview with Chef Bruno Feldeisen – Pastry Chef & Judge on Great Canadian Baking Show

Chef Bruno standing at a bookstore and holding his cookbook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What an honour and joy to interview Chef Bruno Feldeisen!

You may know him as a celebrated pastry chef and judge on CBC’s Great Canadian Baking Show!

In my one-on-one interview with Chef Bruno, we talk about his cookbook Baking with Bruno, his baking career, his journey with anxiety and what’s next.

A few memorable quotes from the Chef:

  • “The idea of the my cookbook is to create memories in the kitchen, spend time together and have a good time…it’s not about the end product, it’s about the process!”
  • “The kitchen is the heartbeat of my house.”
  • Advice for bakers: “It’s all about trial and error!”

Click on the image below to watch or check out the interview on my YouTube channel! Enjoy this special conversation!

Chef Bruno is standing on set at the Great Canadian Baking Show

 

Summertime Eating Tips – from a Dietitian who LOVES dessert!

Collage of fresh summer produce including peaches, lettuce, cherries and red peppers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helloooo Summer!

Who’s ready to fire up the BBQ and enjoy all the glorious seasonal produce? As an award-winning dietitian and daughter of a chef, I’m first in line for delicious, wholesome food – and yes, that includes dessert!

Here are my 4 tips for guilt-free summertime eating, with inspiring recipe ideas from my friends Nik and Carol over at Weekend at the Cottage!

1. Colour it up!

Think of fruits and veggies as Mother Nature’s superheroes – not only are they rich in vitamins and minerals, but they’re also filled with different disease-fighting plant-nutrients also called ‘phyto-nutrients’.

Tomatoes and watermelon for example, are packed with lycopene – it’s what gives these foods a red pigment. Lycopene may help lower your risk for heart disease and prostate cancer. Orange coloured produce such as carrots, cantaloupe, peaches and apricots contain carotenoids like beta-carotene to support your vision and reduces your risk for heart disease and some types of cancer.

Love blueberries? Me too! They contain a special plant nutrient called anthocyanins that are linked to healthy aging and brain health. And what about spinach, kale and Swiss chard? Well, all those leafy greens are packed with lutein, a special antioxidant that lowers your chances of developing age-related macular degeneration.

Dietitian Sue’s tip: At every meal, fill half your plate or bowl with colourful fruits and veggies. Salads are an easy way to get in those colours. Try this Tomato Avocado Salad or Chopped Kale Salad.

 2. Pick your protein

What’s calling your name? Burgers, ribs, poultry, tofu, shrimp?

Pick a protein at every meal. Protein helps you feel alert and full for longer. As part of a meal, protein also slows down the digestion of carbohydrates. This gives you a slow, steady rise in blood sugar levels which is beneficial for anyone with prediabetes or diabetes.

Dietitian Sue’s Tip: Choose lean proteins more often. One of my family faves are Mediterranean Chicken Kebabs and you could swap out the chicken for pork or cubes of firm tofu. For a smart protein choice that’s packed with heart-healthy omega-3 fats, aim for two fish meals a week – like Nik’s Grilled Salmon Burgers and Barbecued Salmon.

3. Find the fibre

We need 25-38 grams of fibre a day. But guess what? Most of us are only getting half that amount. Soluble fibre, found in strawberries, oatmeal and apples play a role in keeping our blood cholesterol levels healthy. Insoluble fibre, found in beans, bran and broccoli, help to keep us regular.

Dietitian Sue’s Tip: If you’re filling half your plate or bowl with fruit and veggies, then you’re already off to a great start! Try Granola or a high fibre breakfast cereal that contains at least 4 grams of fibre per serving. Check out my TV interview ‘Simple Ways to Boost Your Fibre’ for easy ways to pump up the fibre in a day’s worth of meals.

4. Make room for dessert

 I love dessert…as in, I eat dessert every night! For me, it’s really the best part of the meal! Sometimes, dessert is a bowl of fresh fruit salad or a few slices of ice cold watermelon. And sometimes, it’s Peach Cobbler or French vanilla ice cream on a waffle cone or a slice of gluten-free Chickpea Chocolate Cake. Whatever you choose for dessert, dig in and enjoy!

Dietitian Sue’s Tip: Let go of the ‘good food’ versus ‘bad food’ thinking. Give yourself permission to enjoy all foods in moderation without any guilt. Food is joy, and eating together with family / friends is always a celebration!

What recipes are you most excited to try? Let me know in the comments. Happy summer, everyone!

 

What to Eat Before & After the COVID-19 Vaccine

Medical professional wearing blue gloves and about to give a needle to a patient in the armAre you ready to get your jab? You don’t need a special diet before getting your COVID-19 vaccine. But there are a few extra food considerations at this time. Here’s what you can do to get ready and manage potential side effects.

BEFORE getting the COVID vaccine:

  • Take your regular medications as usual. Get a good night’s sleep.
  • Have a snack or light meal depending on the time of your vaccine. The goal is to avoid going for your vaccine on an empty stomach, especially if you have a fear of needles or a history of feeling lightheaded / faint with needles.
  • Eat familiar foods. As a former sports dietitian, I always advised athletes to avoid eating any new foods on “game day.” Consider vaccine day as your “game day” and stick to foods you know so that you don’t trigger any stomach upset.
  • Make some meals made in advance in case you’re too tired or unwell to cook dinner for the next few days after getting the vaccine.

AFTER getting the COVID vaccine:

  • Stay hydrated. You might have a mild fever after getting the vaccine. Keep your mug or water bottle nearby to remind you to get enough fluids throughout the day.
  • Take in some comfort food. Some common symptoms after the vaccine are like chills, fatigue and muscle aches. Try a bowl of chicken noodle soup or your favourite soup to offer some comfort. And cuddle up with a cozy blanket.
  • Hold off on the alcohol. It can dehydrate you even more. Chances are you may not be in the mood for a drink anyway, and less so if you’re feeling headache, chills or the aches.
  • Continue eating a wholesome diet to keep your immune system strong. Think of your immune system as a team with different players. Each player has a role to play. Nutrients like vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, protein and zinc are just some of the key players on Team Immune System. Fill half your plate or bowl with a variety of colourful veggies and fruit. Get vitamin D from eggs, fatty fish, milk, mushrooms, fortified beverages and supplements if needed. Look for whole grains, lean meats / fish / poultry and plant-based foods like tofu, nuts and seeds.

 Keep well everyone!

 

Find Your Healthy with Traditional Cuisines – Week 5

Birds eye view of a platter of chicken paprikas served with Hungarian nokedli dumplings

*To celebrate National Nutrition Month, we have a 5-week series of guest posts written by Deepanshi Salwan, MPH candidate and a dietetic graduate student at the University of Toronto.**

Welcome back to week 5 of the Nutrition Month 2021 blog series! It is the last post of the series. Thank you all for following along!

This year Nutrition Month centres on the idea that healthy eating looks different for everyone. It is not a one-size-fits-all approach, and your healthy eating will look different from someone else’s healthy eating based on culture, food traditions, personal circumstances, and nutritional needs.

To honour  Nutrition Month, I have teamed up with Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Graduate Students from diverse cultural backgrounds to put together a Nutrition Month 2021 blog series! Each week for the month of March, different dietitians and dietetic students will share their food traditions, cultural recipes, and the importance of culture in healthy eating.

Embrace your heritage through cultural foods!

In Week 1, we talked about how cultural foods should be a part of your healthy meals. Read the post here.

In Week 2, we talked about the importance of forming social connections through cultural food. You can find the post here. 

In week 3, we talked about the importance of instilling cultural food heritage in your children. You can find the post here

In week 4, we talked about building a community that appreciates everyone’s food cultures. Read the post here.

Today we will succinctly summarize the valuable lessons from previous weeks and provide an action plan to help you embrace your cultural foods. To wrap up this series, we have my colleagues Lucia Weiler and Lalitha Taylor with us.

 

Headshot of Lucia Weiler

Lucia Weiler, RD, PHEc

Lucia Weiler, RD, PHEc

www.weilernutrition.com  

Instagram: @LuciaWeilerRD

Twitter: @LuciaWeilerRD

  1. What’s your cultural background?

I am Hungarian.

  1. What is the meaning of food in your culture? / How is food used in celebrations or traditions?

Food is family – and food is love. Hungarians know how to cook everything – snout to tail, farm to table. Many like my grandmother and sister are excellent bakers too though that’s not my forte.

  1. What is your favourite cultural ingredient or food or recipe?

Hungarian Cuisine in short! Paprika is the heart of Hungarian cuisine and the traditions go all the way back to the first Hungarians, and some of the dishes have been cooked the same way for hundreds of years. Here is the resource that lists our traditional dishes.

Chicken Paprikas with Hungarian Nokedli dumplings on a platter

Hungarian Chicken Paprikás with Nokedli (Image: Canva)

Chicken Paprikás is a classic simple and good recipe. I make it regularly! Here is the recipe.

Ingredients:

2 ½ -3 lb chicken thighs or drumsticks, 2 onions, chopped, 2 garlic cloves, minced, 2 tbsp vegetable oil, 2 tbsp Hungarian ground paprika, ½ tsp ground black pepper, 2 bell peppers, chopped, 2 tomatoes, chopped, 2 cups water or low sodium chicken broth, ½ cup sour cream, 1 tbsp flour

Instructions: In a large skillet, heat oil and brown chicken on all sides – remove chicken to a plate. Next, add onion to the skillet and cook till golden brown. Add garlic, pepper and tomatoes and cook for another 3 minutes. Turn off heat and stir in the paprika and ground black pepper. Return chicken to the skillet and mix well. Add water or chicken broth until chicken is mostly covered. Bring to boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes. In a small bowl, mix sour cream and flour until the mixture is smooth. Add the sour cream mixture to the chicken paprikas and simmer for 5 minutes until sauce is thickened. Serve with Hungarian nokedli (small dumplings) or penne or rotini. [For a vegetarian version, replace chicken with tofu cubes and reduce cooking time to 10 minutes].

Dietitian’s tip: Serve some veggies on the side such as steamed broccoli or green beans. A fresh cucumber or tomato salad is also fitting. Enjoy! Jó étvágyat!

4. What would you like to say to Canadians during National Nutrition Month?

Enjoy and explore how your culture, food traditions, personal circumstances & nutritional needs all contribute to what healthy looks like for you. Reach out to a registered dietitian to support your healthy eating journey.

 

Headshot of Lalitha Taylor

Lalitha Taylor, RD

Lalitha Taylor, RD

www.taylornutrition.ca

Instagram:  @lalithataylor_rd

Twitter: @lalithataylor

1. What’s your cultural background?

I am half South Indian and the other half is a mixture of Guyanese, Dutch and Bajan.

  1. What is the meaning of food in your culture? / How is food used in celebrations or traditions?

Food in many ways means love to me in my culture. After I left my parent’s home and moved away, every time I returned to see them the first thing my Dad would say is, “Are you hungry? What do you want to eat?” Food has always been a means for my parents to show their care, warmth and love.

To this day, mom will spend days meticulously preparing Indian dishes for special events to ensure we always have enough plus some to share with others. Given my diverse background—celebrations usually include a food combination of Indian, Guyanese, Ukrainian and more. Food is the centre of stories, laughter, crying and celebration. In our culture, food is what draws us together and is always offered to family and friends no matter what time of day.

Birds eye view of a platter of Indian Dahl served over basmati rice

Indian Dahl served with Basmati Rice (Image: Canva)

3. What is your favourite cultural ingredient or food or recipe?

Dahl is an Indian stew and my favourite recipe. It’s comfort food and reminds me of my parents. I now make dahl for my daughter and one day, I suspect she will make dahl for her family. It warms my heart to know that these foods will be passed down from generation to generation along with the positive nostalgic memories. You can find a Dahl recipe here.

4. What would you like to say to Canadians during National Nutrition Month?

There is no “cookie-cutter” approach to our eating—especially when we put into context the uniqueness of everyone’s background which includes honouring people’s culture, food preferences and traditions.

Bottom Line

Your cultural foods and traditions are an expression of your identity! They give you comfort, remind you of favourite memories, and help you bond with loved ones. They also give your child a sense of belonging. Cultural foods are fulfilling and they nourish your body and soul. They make you happy! This is why cultural foods and traditions are so important for your health and wellbeing.

Takeaways

1. Make cultural foods a part of your healthy eating

  • Registered Dietitians can provide you with personalized nutrition advice. They can work with you to incorporate cultural foods in ways that are balanced and satisfying. Click here to find a dietitian near you.

 2. Connect with your loved ones through your cultural foods and traditions

  • Grow, harvest, fish, hunt, and prepare foods in traditional ways with loved ones
  • Celebrate occasions and special holidays with cultural foods and practices
  • Eat the same cultural dish together with your family, in-person or virtually

3. Foster your children’s connection to your cultural heritage through food

  • Cook together a new dish from your culture
  • Ask them to notice aromas and flavours during cooking and eating
  • Talk to them about cultural ingredients, how they are produced and used in recipes
  • Add a cultural ingredient to foods they currently enjoy eating
  • Explore grocery stores, bakeries and restaurants that offer your cultural foods
  • Share your stories and memories with foods from your culture

4. Build a community that appreciates everyone’s food cultures

  • Host a potluck where everyone brings a traditional dish and spend time sharing the meaning of these foods (of course, post COVID!)
  • Try a recipe from a different culture – find them online or ask someone you know
  • Explore the International Aisle in grocery stores
  • Dine-in or order take out from different ethnic restaurants
  • Be curious and ask questions or read about other cultures’ food traditions
  • Attend cultural food festivals like Pan Asian Food Festival and Taste of Danforth

 5. Embrace and flaunt your cultural food traditions

    • Connect with community members or Elders to learn more about your food traditions
    • Talk to others about the significance of your cultural dishes
    • Post photos of your cultural foods on social media. It is a great conversation starter

I thank Lucia and Lalitha for their time and contribution to this post.

headshot of Deepanshi Salwan

Deepanshi Salwan

Written by: Deepanshi Salwan, MPH candidate – Deepanshi is a dietetic graduate student at the University of Toronto. Her nutrition philosophy embraces moderation without deprivation. She believes that healthy eating does not have to be complicated and hopes to inspire her audience to live more happy and healthy lives! You can find her on Instagram @deeconstructing_nutrition.

 

Find Your Healthy with Traditional Cuisines – Week 4

Middle Easter Dolma - grape leaves stuffed with rice and meat - arranged in a white bowl with sliced lemons in the background*To celebrate National Nutrition Month, we have a 5-week series of guest posts written by Deepanshi Salwan, MPH candidate and a dietetic graduate student at the University of Toronto.**

Welcome back to the Nutrition Month 2021 blog series!

This year Nutrition Month centres on the idea that healthy eating looks different for everyone. It is not a one-size-fits-all approach, and your healthy eating will look different from someone else’s healthy eating based on culture, food traditions, personal circumstances, and nutritional needs.

To honour  Nutrition Month, I have teamed up with Registered Dietitians and Dietetic Graduate Students from diverse cultural backgrounds to put together a Nutrition Month 2021 blog series! Each week for the month of March, different dietitians and dietetic students will share their food traditions, cultural recipes, and the importance of culture in healthy eating.

Build a community that appreciates everyone’s food cultures

In Week 1, we talked about how cultural foods should be a part of your healthy meals. Read the post here. In Week 2, we talked about the importance of forming social connections through cultural food. You can find the post here.  In week 3, we talked about the importance of instilling cultural food heritage in your children. You can find the post here.

Today we transition a bit from focusing on our culture to exploring food options from other cultures. I believe we grow a little more when we step out of our comfort zone and appreciate something from a different culture. Similarly, rejecting foods from a different culture before tasting them would be a missed opportunity to grow. In Canada, we do not just tolerate other cultures, we celebrate them, and it should be no different when it comes to food. 

How do you build a community that appreciates everyone’s food cultures? Let’s hear from my colleagues Atour Odisho and Aleeya Zack-Coneybeare!

head shot of Atour Odisho

Atour Odisho, Dietetic Graduate Studen

Atour Odisho, Dietetic Graduate Student

Instagram: @atour.in.nutrition

  1. What’s your cultural background?

I am Middle Eastern

  1. What is the meaning of food in your culture? / How is food used in celebrations or traditions?

In my culture, food is medicine, and in my upbringing food is emphasized in the role of nutrition and healing. It is also a way to celebrate with family and friends. There is never too much food!

  1. What is your favourite cultural ingredient or food or recipe?

My favourite cultural food is dolma, which is wrapped grape leaves. I love this because every Middle Eastern has a different twist to it.  Here is my recipe.

Dolma arranged on a white plate with cut lemons in the backgound

Dolma [Image: Canva]

Ingredients: 4 cups white basmati rice, 8 tomatoes, chopped, 2 bunches of flat parsley, chopped, 4 cloves of garlic, 1 can of tomato paste (or salsa), 1/3 cup pomegranate molasses (or to taste), about 3/4 cup lemon juice, 1 tbsp of extra virgin olive oil, 1 tbsp dill (or to taste), 1 tbsp of sumac, salt & pepper to taste, and 18 oz of grape leaves. You can also mix in 1 pound ground beef or lamb.

Instructions: Mix everything together, except the grape leaves. Once everything is mixed, stuff each grape leaf with the mixture. Make sure all sides are closed, so the rice doesn’t escape when cooking. Next, assort the wrapped grapes leaves in a big pot. Add water and some more lemon juice to cover all grape leaves. Add in an appetizer plate and press down to secure the grape leaves together. Set on high-medium heat until water boils, then let it simmer for 30 minutes. ENJOY!

4. What would you like to say to Canadians during National Nutrition Month?

I hope that Canadians continue to explore other cuisines and dishes to diversify their palates. Cook traditional dishes from other cultures, dine-in restaurants from various cultures, explore International food aisles, or just be curious and ask questions!

head shot: a grad photo of leeya Zack-Coneybeare

Aleeya Zack-Coneybeare
Dietetic Graduate Student

Aleeya Zack-Coneybeare, Dietetic Graduate Student

 

  1. What’s your cultural background?

I am Ojibway which is an Indigenous group here in Canada.

  1. What is the meaning of food in your culture? / How is food used in celebrations or traditions?

Food is ingrained within every aspect of our culture; it represents our way of life. Food connects our people to our traditions, our spirit, and our ancestors. Food plays an important role in our traditional ceremonies, as most usually end in a feast. We also use food to honour our spirits, ancestors, and mother earth by offering a spirit plate before beginning a feast. A spirit plate is filled with samples of all the food items at the feast, we set it outside and offer a prayer.

  1. What is your favourite cultural ingredient or food or recipe?

My favourite cultural ingredient is wild rice, due to its rich nutrients and the variety of recipes and meals it could be added to.

My family makes Turkey and Wild Rice soup very often! Here is the recipe.

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup in a white bowl with a spoon, taken at a birds eye view

Turkey & Wild Rice Soup [Image: Canva]

Ingredients:

Turkey Stock -Turkey carcass (from a roasted bird), 1 carton chicken broth, 1 carton chicken broth, 1 onion, 2 celery sticks, 2 carrots, basil leaf, 1tsp thyme, water to cover

Soup – chicken or vegetable stock, ¾ wild rice, 2 carrots, bite-size, 2 celery sticks, bite-size, 1 tsp chicken bouillon, half yam, chopped, ½ cup corn, 2 cups shredded/chopped turkey meat

Instructions: 

Turkey Stock – In a large pot add carcass, chicken broth, onion, celery and carrots. Add enough water. Add salt, pepper, thyme and basil leaf. Bring to boil and simmer on low for 12 hours. Strain and put the stock back into the pot.

Soup – Add a carton of chicken/vegetable broth to the stock (Taste and add chicken bouillon if needed). Bring to a boil and add wild rice (cook for 30 minutes on a low boil). Add freshly chopped celery and carrots (cook for 10-15 minutes). Add chopped yam (cook for 10-15 minutes). Add corn (cook for 5-10 minutes). Add shredded/chopped turkey meat (cook for 10 minutes). Turn off heat and ready to serve!

4. What would you like to say to Canadians during National Nutrition Month?

I would like to say to Canadians, the Indigenous cuisine is beautiful and that I highly recommend exploring our foods and culture and all the other diverse cuisines Canada has to offer!

Bottom Line

Being accepting and wholeheartedly celebrating other traditional cuisines will allow Canadians of colour to enjoy their cultural foods with pride. There will be no guilt around carrying their cultural foods with them to school, work, or anywhere else they go. As we have discussed through this series, enjoying cultural foods is an important aspect of healthy eating. So, help your fellow Canadians to find their healthy by appreciating their cultural foods and practices!

Come back next week to learn more about traditional cuisines and healthy eating in our final post of the Nutrition Month 2021 blog series. Click here to learn more about the Nutrition Month 2021 campaign.

Let’s Talk

Have you ever tried a dish from a different culture and instantly fell in love with it? Let us know in the comments below!

headshot of Deepanshi Salwan

Deepanshi Salwan

Written by: Deepanshi Salwan, MPH candidate – Deepanshi is a dietetic graduate student at the University of Toronto. Her nutrition philosophy embraces moderation without deprivation. She believes that healthy eating does not have to be complicated and hopes to inspire her audience to live more happy and healthy lives! You can find her on Instagram @deeconstructing_nutrition.

 

 

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