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Cool Facts About World Refrigeration Day!

A cartoon refrigerator surrounded by images of fruits, vegetables and the earth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that June 26 is World Refrigeration Day?

Refrigeration is one of the most important engineering initiatives of the last century and is at the very heart of modern day life. Just think of the many ways in which this technology improves our lives:

  • Food safety: Bacteria can grow quickly in food at temperatures between 4°C to 60°C, potentially causing foodborne illness. But the cooling provided by refrigerators and freezers in our homes, restaurants and retailers slows bacterial growth, keeping foods safe to eat. Not to mention the cooling technology that allows perishable foods to be harvested and transported to their final destination.
  • Food waste reduction: One way to reduce food waste at home is to use up leftovers. Thanks to refrigeration and freezing, most cooked meals can keep about 3-4 days in the fridge and between 2-6 months in the freezer. For a detailed guide to storing leftovers, check out Health Canada’s info about Leftovers: How Long Will They Last? or this Cold Food Storage Chart.  
  • Food availability and nutrition: Freezing allows fruits and vegetables to be picked at their peak ripeness and then frozen – often within hours – to lock in maximum nutrition and flavour. When fresh, seasonal produce is not available, frozen is an excellent, nutritious and affordable option.  
  • Planetary health: Cooling reduces one of the largest contributors to climate change – the emission of greenhouse gases from food that is lost due to spoilage and waste.

Dr. Leslie Oliver sitting at his deskDr. Leslie Oliver (pictured), a member of the HVACR Heritage Centre Founding Committee and his father Howard Oliver were pioneers of early refrigeration in Canada.

The HVACR Heritage Centre is a volunteer driven heritage organization whose mandate is to preserve and record the history of heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration technologies and how they’ve changed our lives. Dr. Leslie Oliver, a professional engineer appraised historic artifacts as well as documented the contributions of the industry’s work since its early years. By 1928, his father T. H. [Howard] Oliver became one of Canada’s first high tech workers in the field of internal combustion, radio and refrigeration. Howard started the family business T.H. Oliver Ltd. which Leslie later took over as Vice President and General Manager. Read the inspiring stories behind cooling technology and its impacts on society at their virtual museum.

 

This post was sponsored by the HVACR Heritage Centre to raise awareness of World Refrigeration Day and recognize the invaluable contributions of this technology. Opinions are my own.

Does diet affect erectile function?

A man in a blue shirt sitting on a sofa and speaking to a health professional.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s the question you may have always wondered, but were too shy to ask!

June is Men’s Health Month, so let’s take a look at some of the research on this topic.

A study published in the Journal of the American Association Network Open journal suggests that a healthy dietary pattern may play a role in maintaining erectile function in men. Researchers from the University of California and Harvard University looked at the food and nutrient data from over 21,000 healthy men aged 40 to 75 who had no previous diagnosis of erectile dysfunction or diabetes or heart disease. The men were part of the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. The researchers found that men at all ages who followed a Mediterranean-style diet had the lowest risk of erectile dysfunction. A Mediterranean-style diet focuses on fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes and fish.

Fruits and vegetables contain special plant nutrients called flavonoids.  Researchers in Greece found that eating fruits and vegetables lowered the risk for erectile dysfunction by 32% in men aged 18 to 40 years.

Another study from researchers in Spain looked at 83 healthy men aged 18-35. For 14 weeks, these men were asked to follow their usual diet and were divided into 2 groups – one group also ate 60 grams (about ½ cup) of nuts a day such as walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts; the other group of men did not eat nuts. The study found that a healthy diet supplemented with mixed nuts may help to improve erectile and sexual desire.

Bottom line: Fruits, vegetables and nuts are the foundation of an overall healthy diet that can benefit not only your heart health but also your sexual health.

 

Garlic Shrimp Linguine

A plate of shrimp linguine with broccoli florets.

Garlic Shrimp Linguine

Calling all pasta lovers! This fast and easy dish is perfect for dinner on a busy weeknight or lazy weekend!
Course Dinner

Ingredients
  

  • 1 package (454 g) uncooked linguine
  • 2 cups broccoli florets
  • 3-4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 400 g frozen shrimp (thawed, peeled and deveined)
  • 2 T olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped

Instructions
 

  • Cook pasta ccording to package directions. Add broccoli florets during the last 2 minutes of cooking. Drain pasta and broccoli, and set aside.
  • In a medium-sized bowl, toss shrimp with minced garlic.
  • Heat oil over medium heat in a frying pan. Add shrimp and garlic. Season with a pinch of salt. Cook for about 2-3 minutes on one side, flip and cook for another 2 mnutes or until shrimp beginsto turn pink.
  • Add cooked pasta and broccol. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Pour in lemon juice. Toss until pasta is well coated.
  • Garnish with chopped parsley. Sprinkle on parmesan cheese just before serving.
Keyword Garlic Shrimp Linguine, Linguine, Pasta, shrimp, Shrimp Linguine

Best Shrimp Fried Rice

 

2 bowls of shrimp fried rice

Best Shrimp Fried Rice

The secret to making the best fried rice is to use cold, leftover cooked rice. The grains are drier, giving you just the right texture. (Using freshly cooked rice results in a soggier fried rice!)
Course Dinner, Lunch
Servings 4

Ingredients
  

  • 4 tsp canola oil
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1 cup frozen green peas, rinsed
  • 2 eggs, slightly beaten
  • 3 cups cold, leftover cooked white or brown rice
  • 2 Tbsp sodium reduced soy sauce
  • 1 cup cooked shriimp

Instructions
 

  • In a large fry pan, heat 2 tsp oil over medium-high heat.
  • Add onions and cook for 1 minute.
  • Add mushrooms and cook for another 2 minutes.
  • Add peas and cook all of these veggies for another minute.
  • Place veggies aside in a bowl while you cook the eggs.
  • Add 2 tsp oil to the pan. Pour in the eggs and scramble to cook. Place cooked eggs aside in the bowl with the veggies.
  • Crumble the leftover rice with your hands and add to the pan. (Add a bit more oil if needed.) Mix until thoroughly heated. Add soy sauce and mix well.
  • Stir in the cooked onions, mushrooms, peas, eggs and shrimp.
Keyword Fried rice, Shrimp fried rice

Watermelon Salad

 

Watermelon Salad

Watermelon Salad

You can't have a picnic without watermelon! This Watermelon Salad is so flavourful and refreshing - enjoy!
Course Salad

Ingredients
  

Salad

  • 1/2 small watermelon, peeled and cut into cubes
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese (or more if you'd like)
  • 1/4 cup fresh mint leaves, chopped

Dressing

  • 2 Tbsp lime juice
  • 1-2 Tbsp honey
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil

Instructions
 

  • Add watermelon pieces to a large bowl. Sprinkle in feta cheese and mint.
  • In a small bowl or jar, whisk together the dressing ingredients.
  • Drizzle dressing over salad and gently toss.
Keyword Picnic, Picnic recipes, Picnic salads, Salads, summer recipes, Watermelon, Watermelon Salad

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